What's the Best Tool for Your Children to Learn Typing?
Despite the rising popularity of computers, laptops, and tablets, it's a little surprising to note that typewriters are still being sold by some companies. Many people believe that the typewriter is an outdated technology that is only used by individuals who do not have sufficient computer skills to use modern tools. However, a recent report reveals that some famous writers and journalists tend to find comfort and peace when working at a typewriter instead of the computer.
These writers argue that the lack of an "autocorrect" option and of the distractions posed by the internet means that their thinking process is accelerated when working on a typewriter. As there are more steps to go through to erase a mistake than simply by pressing [Delete], an old-model typewriter compels typists to think long and hard before starting typing. Furthermore, the typewriter does not pose any security threats and won't malfunction simply due to power outages.
This makes it logical to pose a question about whether children should learn typing through the traditional low-tech typewriter keyboard, or resort to the technologically advanced computers with their high-tech features. It can be argued that children should learn to type using a computer as ultimately they will be using a computer during their professional and university life. Using the computer from an early age will ensure high levels of competency and sufficiently high typing speed in that medium.
Conversely, learning typing using computers can significantly harm a student's spelling and grammar skills, if they rely too much on the high-tech support a computer provides. Recent reports indicate that the new generation of students largely fail to spell correctly due to the easy availability of autocorrect options. Furthermore, the fact that deleting and rearranging text is so easy with a computer, students that learn to type from computers are less likely to think about formulating and creating a logical, sequential outline before drafting an essay.
Despite arguments in favor of the older typewriter and the strong traditions that are associated with this tool, it is quite difficult to image children in the 21st century learning typing with the help of typewriters. The computer age means that computers are embedded within every part of our lives, and therefore it means that it is virtually impossible to encourage children to learn from typewriters, especially since the machines themselves are harder and harder to find these days. However, children can still be encouraged to apply the lessons from the older machines to the new format, and take a minute to think about what they're writing, learn to spell words correctly, and not rely on grammar-checking help from a computer to get the high marks they want in school.